So here's the question : How to make a pokemon fangame?

Anqelicc

Novice
Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2021
Posts
12
Age
17
Soooo i have been playing pokemon games for as long as i can remember. Tho, i did stop playing them due to studies and work but in the past few months, i was able to somehow make some time for playing games and started playing pokemon games again.. "Fangames" to be exact. And i do wanna say that after playing so many, specifically from here (don't look at my badges. It's only been few months since i have started to play games diligently widhtout quiting just cuz they are hard af, otherwise i've played majority of the badge-games and other cute-non-badge-games), i finally came to a conclusion - I WANNA MAKE A FANGAME TOO!

even thooo..
1. dk any programming language
2. lappy is alryte, not too much space becuz of disk probs
3. not enof time cuz exams but still

NOW, as for why i want to make fangames is because
1. i LOVE fangames (they are ducking amazing/creative/colourful(with a few exceptions)/the plot is sick/ just don't have words for how the fangames make me feel(regardless of the different types of graphics in each game. love them all. sometimes, its very aesthetic, sometimes very nostalgic)
2. i LOVE a good storyline, be it be short and simple, or long and complex.. it just doesn't matter.

and yes, i am willing to learn the required things i need to learn to develope such games, so kindlyyyyy do tell me howwww and where to start. ill make time, and istg when my game does come out, although it might take time as i'll have to learn a lot of things first, ig, but still.. when it comes out, ill going to throw myself over everyone and hug them U-U. jkjkjkjk.. i meant when it does come out, it'll be good. I'll make sure of it. Maybe not perfect but it'll be the best i can do.
 

AenaonDogsky

Arbiter of Doggos
Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2017
Posts
284
Besides from the tutorial series you've been recommended, these also apply:

General:
- start small, make a small game, across a few maps. Don't be shy about feedback, adjust accordingly, then make another small game.

- be consistent but dont overdo it, you don't want to burn yourself out, especially when its your first few games, but this huge motivation you feel as a beginner won't be enough to drive you forward as time goes by. But if you are disciplined and devote a few hours each week, you'll have a game in no time, despite any fluctuations in motivation and energy.

- do a little bit of everything, but don't rush. However, do pick an area that you are better at (most likely you'll know based on feedback), and stick with it. Make your game around your strength. For instance, you said you like the story the most- and after enough practice you get good at it. Your game wont need good graphics, or music, or even the best of executions to tell that story well. Focus on your strengths. You can make a great game with default graphics, bland music, and even no dialogue!

- try to go for something original with each new attempt. Small, complete games will give you a lot of experience, whereas huge unfinished projects may not.

Specific:
-
once you have the tutorials down, take a good look at the example maps in the default Essentials. Almost everything you'd need for your standard game is there. It is vital that you not only copy-paste the events you need, but that you understand why and how the event works. Why is there a "wait for move completion" command after a "move route" command, for instance?

And to answer your questions/remarks:

1) You don't need to learn any programming language (yet), the game uses an interface with something that resembles visual scripting (putting commands that "represent" blocks of codes in a specific order to make something happen). The general logic is the same with programming, but you won't need to worry about programming per se for now. You'll simply use commands such as "show image" or , "move character > turn character left, move down, move down, move right", etc.

2) You don't need a lot of disk space - especially if you won't download five gazillion pokemon tracks from youtube (which by the way, are usually so big in size that one track could be as big as all your graphic resources combined). Use a few select tracks, and no more than you need.

3) In the hobbyist scene, time is indeed scarce. That's why it takes so long for games to be made. But half the fun is in the act of making the game, regardless of amount of time spent on it. As I said before, be consistent, because the initial excitement can't be kept up for months upon months. But a good consistent schedule, will produce results.
 

Anqelicc

Novice
Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2021
Posts
12
Age
17
You could start here:

thankyouu! will watch

Besides from the tutorial series you've been recommended, these also apply:

General:
- start small, make a small game, across a few maps. Don't be shy about feedback, adjust accordingly, then make another small game.

- be consistent but dont overdo it, you don't want to burn yourself out, especially when its your first few games, but this huge motivation you feel as a beginner won't be enough to drive you forward as time goes by. But if you are disciplined and devote a few hours each week, you'll have a game in no time, despite any fluctuations in motivation and energy.

- do a little bit of everything, but don't rush. However, do pick an area that you are better at (most likely you'll know based on feedback), and stick with it. Make your game around your strength. For instance, you said you like the story the most- and after enough practice you get good at it. Your game wont need good graphics, or music, or even the best of executions to tell that story well. Focus on your strengths. You can make a great game with default graphics, bland music, and even no dialogue!

- try to go for something original with each new attempt. Small, complete games will give you a lot of experience, whereas huge unfinished projects may not.

Specific:
-
once you have the tutorials down, take a good look at the example maps in the default Essentials. Almost everything you'd need for your standard game is there. It is vital that you not only copy-paste the events you need, but that you understand why and how the event works. Why is there a "wait for move completion" command after a "move route" command, for instance?

And to answer your questions/remarks:

1) You don't need to learn any programming language (yet), the game uses an interface with something that resembles visual scripting (putting commands that "represent" blocks of codes in a specific order to make something happen). The general logic is the same with programming, but you won't need to worry about programming per se for now. You'll simply use commands such as "show image" or , "move character > turn character left, move down, move down, move right", etc.

2) You don't need a lot of disk space - especially if you won't download five gazillion pokemon tracks from youtube (which by the way, are usually so big in size that one track could be as big as all your graphic resources combined). Use a few select tracks, and no more than you need.

3) In the hobbyist scene, time is indeed scarce. That's why it takes so long for games to be made. But half the fun is in the act of making the game, regardless of amount of time spent on it. As I said before, be consistent, because the initial excitement can't be kept up for months upon months. But a good consistent schedule, will produce results.
Thank youuu! All of this was really helpful! u-u
 

Jewelwriter

Rainbow Mage
Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2019
Posts
35
To our OP, I want you to keep this in mind.

1) Do you want to craft? Is it like Gens 1-5, is it something like a card game like me, or is it something that is completely different from the rest?
2) Have you looked into the resources that are for your target audience? If you are trying to program then I can't recommend this place enough. Otherwise, you'd kind of have to go the way I do and look into the market to see what works for you.
3) Are you going to use original Pokemon (Do not steal ;) ) or are you going with keeping what is in existence but with your own twists?

After answering all of those questions will you likely have a good direction for you to go with your creation and craft something. I'm Sorry this isn't here so fast but I just finished Turkey day actions.
 
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