Feedback Project Sandbox

Echo

Novice
Member
Posts
19
This is what the water starter is probably going to look like.
Hmm... I got to ask... Are you purposely making larger sprites? Or are you forgetting to reduce the size before spriting? Standard essentials has the graphics blown up to double the size, and then scales them later.

For perspective's sake, just in case, these are the actual sprite sizes of official pokemon sprites vs yours...


You might be doing this on purpose, so just say if I am off base. It just seems oddly like you might be making that mistake, since your art shown here matches the already scaled up sizes from Pokemon essentials.
 

EpicCoolGuy923

Novice
Member
Posts
38
Hmm... I got to ask... Are you purposely making larger sprites? Or are you forgetting to reduce the size before spriting? Standard essentials has the graphics blown up to double the size, and then scales them later.

For perspective's sake, just in case, these are the actual sprite sizes of official pokemon sprites vs yours...


You might be doing this on purpose, so just say if I am off base. It just seems oddly like you might be making that mistake, since your art shown here matches the already scaled up sizes from Pokemon essentials.
Well not intentionally... When I made my Full Form Lunatone I took the essentials front sprite for Lunatone and built every sprite so far off those dimensions. I assumed that was the dimensions I had to follow for producing my sprites. Do I need to half my canvas size for Pokèmon Essentials to render it properly at "normal" size?
 

Poq

Elite Trainer
Member
Posts
111
Well not intentionally... When I made my Full Form Lunatone I took the essentials front sprite for Lunatone and built every sprite so far off those dimensions. I assumed that was the dimensions I had to follow for producing my sprites. Do I need to half my canvas size for Pokèmon Essentials to render it properly at "normal" size?
Sort of...
It's an RMXP thing. Basically, to get the graphics to have their standard resolution, their size has to be doubled. So for instance, if you want a new 16x16 tile, you have to make it 32x32 and make every pixel a 2x2 pixel. Most creators start out drawing it in a standard size and then doubling the image size to add it to their game.
When you were editing that Lunatone, it was a sorite that had already been doubled. So when you used that image size as your base for NEW sprites, you were inadvertently doubling the resolution.
 

EpicCoolGuy923

Novice
Member
Posts
38
Sort of...
It's an RMXP thing. Basically, to get the graphics to have their standard resolution, their size has to be doubled. So for instance, if you want a new 16x16 tile, you have to make it 32x32 and make every pixel a 2x2 pixel. Most creators start out drawing it in a standard size and then doubling the image size to add it to their game.
When you were editing that Lunatone, it was a sorite that had already been doubled. So when you used that image size as your base for NEW sprites, you were inadvertently doubling the resolution.
That makes much more sense! Thanks!!
 

Phoenixsong

mulberry ambush
Member
Posts
35
If I may, it's perfectly fine to draw your sprites at the increased size. It just means that your sprites are "higher resolution" compared to what's usually used. In fact, there are plenty of people who do that on purpose (for example, Ethereal Gates/Sea & Sky—check out the size of their former final stage grass starter's sprite), because they want the cleaner look of a sprite meant for display at 192x192 rather than a sprite that was meant to be 96x96 but had to be sized up to fit Essentials because it was easier than the alternative of redrawing it. A while back there was even a project going on to make new sprites for all of the canon pokémon in a hi-res style, although I can't find it by searching the current boards; it doesn't look like it was brought over after the move. I found the Internet Archive backup of the thread here, if you want to have a look at it and see what the participants did. (You should still be able to use these sprites assuming you follow the proper directions for credit in that thread, though maybe try to contact SpeedXaaa on their DeviantArt first just in case?)

The one thing to note is that your "HD" sprites may look out of place next to the rest of your tiles and interface (and existing pokémon sprites, since it sounds like your game is also going to include canon pokémon) if they aren't also redrawn to fit RMXP's standard resolution, or at least using sprites from the Hi-Res project. If you don't want to redo all of those, or at least the battle interface, to match, it would be easier to keep your visuals consistent if you sprited at the "standard" size and then just doubled the dimensions afterward, as mentioned above. Either option works, really. It all depends on the look you're going for, how important consistency is to you, and how much work you're willing to put in.

(That said, just as a heads up, if you're looking for things like sprite, fakemon design and mapping advice specifically, as opposed to game design ideas or plot ideas, there are threads meant just for that here, here and here. You may get more focused comments if you post those sorts of things in their dedicated threads!)
 

EpicCoolGuy923

Novice
Member
Posts
38
If I may, it's perfectly fine to draw your sprites at the increased size. It just means that your sprites are "higher resolution" compared to what's usually used. In fact, there are plenty of people who do that on purpose (for example, Ethereal Gates/Sea & Sky—check out the size of their former final stage grass starter's sprite), because they want the cleaner look of a sprite meant for display at 192x192 rather than a sprite that was meant to be 96x96 but had to be sized up to fit Essentials because it was easier than the alternative of redrawing it. A while back there was even a project going on to make new sprites for all of the canon pokémon in a hi-res style, although I can't find it by searching the current boards; it doesn't look like it was brought over after the move. I found the Internet Archive backup of the thread here, if you want to have a look at it and see what the participants did. (You should still be able to use these sprites assuming you follow the proper directions for credit in that thread, though maybe try to contact SpeedXaaa on their DeviantArt first just in case?)

The one thing to note is that your "HD" sprites may look out of place next to the rest of your tiles and interface (and existing pokémon sprites, since it sounds like your game is also going to include canon pokémon) if they aren't also redrawn to fit RMXP's standard resolution, or at least using sprites from the Hi-Res project. If you don't want to redo all of those, or at least the battle interface, to match, it would be easier to keep your visuals consistent if you sprited at the "standard" size and then just doubled the dimensions afterward, as mentioned above. Either option works, really. It all depends on the look you're going for, how important consistency is to you, and how much work you're willing to put in.

(That said, just as a heads up, if you're looking for things like sprite, fakemon design and mapping advice specifically, as opposed to game design ideas or plot ideas, there are threads meant just for that here, here and here. You may get more focused comments if you post those sorts of things in their dedicated threads!)
Thanks for the advice! I might toss one into essentials and see how it looks first. Would this also apply to the region map??
 

Phoenixsong

mulberry ambush
Member
Posts
35
I'd assume so. Like Poq said, RMXP is simply designed to use graphical resources at a different scale from the Gen 4/5 Pokémon games, so it's usually safe to assume that you either need to double the size or start out working at the increased size in the first place. Granted, in the case of the region map that's really just displaying a generic image with a bit of special Essentials code on top; I don't think it uses any default RMXP functions for displaying a world map, so there are no default resources to compare to, unlike, say, tilesets. But since the maps were designed to fit the same resolution as the rest of the Pokémon assets, it stands to reason that yes, it would also need to be resized or redrawn to fit.
 
Posts
38
Nice start. I noticed that some of the path corners need to be adjusted as well as the waterfall being moved to it does not come down onto the land. I would also make some of the paths slightly wider in Picture 1. There are also a few other slight issues with you cross using different sprites such as grass to cave entrance and the grass path on a grassless mountain. Hope this helps!
 

Karpy

NinjaFish Legion!
Member
Posts
43
Nice start. I noticed that some of the path corners need to be adjusted as well as the waterfall being moved to it does not come down onto the land. I would also make some of the paths slightly wider in Picture 1. There are also a few other slight issues with you cross using different sprites such as grass to cave entrance and the grass path on a grassless mountain. Hope this helps!
thanks ill fix all those
 
Posts
16
I’m making a game that will have some TCG-inspired features, and will also introduce new forms of existing Pokémon that have typings different from their regular forms.
Partly to familiarize players with the new form typings, I was thinking of displaying each battle participant’s type(s) in the battle interface databox. This would also be similar to how Pokémon cards display their types right on the cards themselves.

Would this be a good idea to familiarize players with new typings in keeping with a slight TCG theme, or would players rather discover new typings on their own?

Note: I don't plan on making the sprites for the new Pokémon forms radically different from their regular forms' sprites, so a quick glance at their sprites alone might not lead a player to expect a different typing.
 
Last edited:

boris_morris

Rookie
Member
Posts
6
I’m making a game that will have some TCG-inspired features, and will also introduce new forms of existing Pokémon that have typings different from their regular forms.
Partly to familiarize players with the new form typings, I was thinking of displaying each battle participant’s type(s) in the battle interface databox. This would also be similar to how Pokémon cards display their types right on the cards themselves.

Would this be a good idea to familiarize players with new typings in keeping with a slight TCG theme, or would players rather discover new typings on their own?

Note: I don't plan on making the sprites for the new Pokémon forms radically different from their regular forms' sprites, so a quick glance at their sprites alone might not lead a player to expect a different typing.

Obviously, you'll get mixed opinions, but I say show the typing. I personally get more out of "Oh sweet! A ghost/fire marowak!" than "Well, that didn't work... let's try maybe a... grass attack?"
 

boris_morris

Rookie
Member
Posts
6
Maybe you guys/gals with more experience can clarify something for me.

- I have a region that is very tall and really fits better onto 2 separate maps (Northern & Southern hemispheres)
- I only want one dex (and I don't want it to be the National because then I think I have to delete a lot of assets, reassign #'s, footprints, cries, etc)
- I only want 8 total badges (3 in the North, 5 in the South)
A) Can I have two region maps use the same dex that isn't the National?
B) Can I have a single trainer card that doesn't care what region the player is in at any given time?
C) Would the easiest solution be to just cram my whole region onto a single region map to avoid the headache?
D) Forgive me; I don't know what I'm doing
 
I think the answer is yes to both A and B! Pokemon Uranium did something very similar-in fact, the only difference was that it was east/west instead! With C, I think you'd need to consider how large North and South are. If North doesn't have a lot of other towns, it might not be worth the trouble of an extra map.

If you do end up making an extra map, make sure to include an easy spot to switch between the two, like the short bit of water between Kanto and Johto. East/West Tandor wasn't very popular in Uranium, because the only way to go from West to East was to go along an entire route-a water route, no less.
 

Pokèmoto_19

A guy who likes making Pokemon games :D
Member
Posts
1
So, i'm started working on a Pokemon game about 7 months ago, I started learning, now I have officially started developing! I just wanted to see if this was a good idea for a villian team:
Team Freedom, a group of people who believe rules are useless, and we should all be allowed to do whatever we want, in my game you start in 2005, and you disband Team Freedom, intell 2019, where your child, runs into them, the reformed version, made by the original bosses daughter, is this a good idea or should I adjust it?
 
Top