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Echo

Novice
Member
Posts
12
This is what the water starter is probably going to look like.
Hmm... I got to ask... Are you purposely making larger sprites? Or are you forgetting to reduce the size before spriting? Standard essentials has the graphics blown up to double the size, and then scales them later.

For perspective's sake, just in case, these are the actual sprite sizes of official pokemon sprites vs yours...


You might be doing this on purpose, so just say if I am off base. It just seems oddly like you might be making that mistake, since your art shown here matches the already scaled up sizes from Pokemon essentials.
 

EpicCoolGuy923

Novice
Member
Posts
35
Hmm... I got to ask... Are you purposely making larger sprites? Or are you forgetting to reduce the size before spriting? Standard essentials has the graphics blown up to double the size, and then scales them later.

For perspective's sake, just in case, these are the actual sprite sizes of official pokemon sprites vs yours...


You might be doing this on purpose, so just say if I am off base. It just seems oddly like you might be making that mistake, since your art shown here matches the already scaled up sizes from Pokemon essentials.
Well not intentionally... When I made my Full Form Lunatone I took the essentials front sprite for Lunatone and built every sprite so far off those dimensions. I assumed that was the dimensions I had to follow for producing my sprites. Do I need to half my canvas size for Pokèmon Essentials to render it properly at "normal" size?
 

Poq

Trainer
Member
Posts
81
Well not intentionally... When I made my Full Form Lunatone I took the essentials front sprite for Lunatone and built every sprite so far off those dimensions. I assumed that was the dimensions I had to follow for producing my sprites. Do I need to half my canvas size for Pokèmon Essentials to render it properly at "normal" size?
Sort of...
It's an RMXP thing. Basically, to get the graphics to have their standard resolution, their size has to be doubled. So for instance, if you want a new 16x16 tile, you have to make it 32x32 and make every pixel a 2x2 pixel. Most creators start out drawing it in a standard size and then doubling the image size to add it to their game.
When you were editing that Lunatone, it was a sorite that had already been doubled. So when you used that image size as your base for NEW sprites, you were inadvertently doubling the resolution.
 

EpicCoolGuy923

Novice
Member
Posts
35
Sort of...
It's an RMXP thing. Basically, to get the graphics to have their standard resolution, their size has to be doubled. So for instance, if you want a new 16x16 tile, you have to make it 32x32 and make every pixel a 2x2 pixel. Most creators start out drawing it in a standard size and then doubling the image size to add it to their game.
When you were editing that Lunatone, it was a sorite that had already been doubled. So when you used that image size as your base for NEW sprites, you were inadvertently doubling the resolution.
That makes much more sense! Thanks!!
 

Phoenixsong

mulberry ambush
Member
Posts
35
If I may, it's perfectly fine to draw your sprites at the increased size. It just means that your sprites are "higher resolution" compared to what's usually used. In fact, there are plenty of people who do that on purpose (for example, Ethereal Gates/Sea & Sky—check out the size of their former final stage grass starter's sprite), because they want the cleaner look of a sprite meant for display at 192x192 rather than a sprite that was meant to be 96x96 but had to be sized up to fit Essentials because it was easier than the alternative of redrawing it. A while back there was even a project going on to make new sprites for all of the canon pokémon in a hi-res style, although I can't find it by searching the current boards; it doesn't look like it was brought over after the move. I found the Internet Archive backup of the thread here, if you want to have a look at it and see what the participants did. (You should still be able to use these sprites assuming you follow the proper directions for credit in that thread, though maybe try to contact SpeedXaaa on their DeviantArt first just in case?)

The one thing to note is that your "HD" sprites may look out of place next to the rest of your tiles and interface (and existing pokémon sprites, since it sounds like your game is also going to include canon pokémon) if they aren't also redrawn to fit RMXP's standard resolution, or at least using sprites from the Hi-Res project. If you don't want to redo all of those, or at least the battle interface, to match, it would be easier to keep your visuals consistent if you sprited at the "standard" size and then just doubled the dimensions afterward, as mentioned above. Either option works, really. It all depends on the look you're going for, how important consistency is to you, and how much work you're willing to put in.

(That said, just as a heads up, if you're looking for things like sprite, fakemon design and mapping advice specifically, as opposed to game design ideas or plot ideas, there are threads meant just for that here, here and here. You may get more focused comments if you post those sorts of things in their dedicated threads!)
 

EpicCoolGuy923

Novice
Member
Posts
35
If I may, it's perfectly fine to draw your sprites at the increased size. It just means that your sprites are "higher resolution" compared to what's usually used. In fact, there are plenty of people who do that on purpose (for example, Ethereal Gates/Sea & Sky—check out the size of their former final stage grass starter's sprite), because they want the cleaner look of a sprite meant for display at 192x192 rather than a sprite that was meant to be 96x96 but had to be sized up to fit Essentials because it was easier than the alternative of redrawing it. A while back there was even a project going on to make new sprites for all of the canon pokémon in a hi-res style, although I can't find it by searching the current boards; it doesn't look like it was brought over after the move. I found the Internet Archive backup of the thread here, if you want to have a look at it and see what the participants did. (You should still be able to use these sprites assuming you follow the proper directions for credit in that thread, though maybe try to contact SpeedXaaa on their DeviantArt first just in case?)

The one thing to note is that your "HD" sprites may look out of place next to the rest of your tiles and interface (and existing pokémon sprites, since it sounds like your game is also going to include canon pokémon) if they aren't also redrawn to fit RMXP's standard resolution, or at least using sprites from the Hi-Res project. If you don't want to redo all of those, or at least the battle interface, to match, it would be easier to keep your visuals consistent if you sprited at the "standard" size and then just doubled the dimensions afterward, as mentioned above. Either option works, really. It all depends on the look you're going for, how important consistency is to you, and how much work you're willing to put in.

(That said, just as a heads up, if you're looking for things like sprite, fakemon design and mapping advice specifically, as opposed to game design ideas or plot ideas, there are threads meant just for that here, here and here. You may get more focused comments if you post those sorts of things in their dedicated threads!)
Thanks for the advice! I might toss one into essentials and see how it looks first. Would this also apply to the region map??
 

Phoenixsong

mulberry ambush
Member
Posts
35
I'd assume so. Like Poq said, RMXP is simply designed to use graphical resources at a different scale from the Gen 4/5 Pokémon games, so it's usually safe to assume that you either need to double the size or start out working at the increased size in the first place. Granted, in the case of the region map that's really just displaying a generic image with a bit of special Essentials code on top; I don't think it uses any default RMXP functions for displaying a world map, so there are no default resources to compare to, unlike, say, tilesets. But since the maps were designed to fit the same resolution as the rest of the Pokémon assets, it stands to reason that yes, it would also need to be resized or redrawn to fit.
 
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